A Strong Point of View

By | March 17, 2014

We are interviewing for some VP positions and it has me thinking about one trait that I look for in a candidate, regardless of position.

Does this person have a strong point of view?

Not all leaders are managers and not all managers are leaders.  However, leaders usually have a strong point of view, a vision about where they want to go.  I love working with people like this.

I like to think that I endorse a meritocracy on a daily basis.  I try to make sure that the best idea wins within the framework of the real (not ideal) environment.  This is part of my point of view.

When interviewing an engineer (for example), I love to hear about where they think technology is going.  I might disagree with their vision, but I respect people who put themselves out there and make a bet.

Then comes the problem…

When faced with new information, something that contradicts your vision and point of view, do you adapt and change?

Tea Party Republicans (sorry to anyone who will be offended) will ignore science, facts, evidence and logic to “stick to their principles”.  They would literally die before they admitted they are wrong about Climate Change or any of a number of issues.  “Flip-flopping” is considered a deadly trait in politics.  It’s like you need to be right immediately because you can never change your mind or be convinced of the merits of an alternate point of view.

Having a strong point of view doesn’t mean you can’t change your mind.  It just means that when you are convinced of a new course, you adopt that course with zeal.

This is tricky stuff.  You get too attached to your point of view and you become stubborn.  You go with the flow and fail to lead in a positive direction.  Like in many things, balance is required.

Well, that’s my point of view anyway.

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