The UX of Warnings (Mixed Mode Example)

When you visit a page that has some HTTP and some HTTPS elements on it, you sometimes get a warning (especially in Internet Explorer).  Even though most people don’t care, Microsoft feels compelled to tell you about this problem when it happens.  Firefox, Chrome, Safari…they don’t bug you with this technical mumbo jumbo.  But…there is a bigger problem.

In IE6/IE7:
mixedModeIE6

In IE8:
mixedModeIE8

My simple question is: What the hell did you do???

Notice in IE6 and IE7, the answer to the question is YES.  In IE8, the answer to the question is NO.  What the hell!?!  Please, could someone at Microsoft read this security warning?  It’s clearly written by a sadist! It doesn’t even make sense.  How is a layman supposed to understand what this means?  It sounds scary, but doesn’t help the user!  And more importantly, you changed the answer from NO to YES!  Do you see how different that is?  NO != YES

Ugh.  The first warning at least made sense.  Seriously, this warning shouldn’t even be there.  Bad Microsoft!  Bad!

One Reply to “The UX of Warnings (Mixed Mode Example)”

  1. Maybe they’re covering their asses as best as they can. I must admit, having “yes” as the default answer to the IE6/IE7 question always did trouble me.

Leave a Reply