Electoral College

By | September 16, 2004

This article goes into detail about each State’s current policy in national elections regarding “winner takes all”. In short, if you win Florida by 1 vote, you win ALL 25 electoral votes, not 13.

Wouldn’t it be great if we just had the popular vote elect the president? That would mean that a dozen hicks in North Dakota would get less attention than say a million people in Oakland. Cities might get cleaned up! I can dream, can’t I?

2 thoughts on “Electoral College

  1. Dan Lipka

    I couldn’t agree more, and legislation to make the change would easily pass the House; however, it would be dead in the Senate. Somebody I know said that the Senate was still important and that we shouldn’t get rid of it, but I couldn’t disagree more. The Senate is holding this country down. It is not democratic in the sense that every citizen does not get equal representation.

    Even the total electoral votes aren’t even. States like Delaware, Wyoming, and Alaska have more than a 3:1 advantage over bigger states in term of population per electoral vote. It terms of the Senate; the average US state has 5.5 million people, meaning that every state under that number gets more representation per person than those above. Currently there are 33 states below that number, giving them a huge majority in the Senate and making it impossible to ever change anything. Note: the total population of all those 33 states is less than the combined population of Florida, New York, Texas, and California (however, the former get 66 senators, while the latter get only 8). Is this Democracy?

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  2. Pingback: The Electoral College is Bad – commadot.com

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